3 Comments

DID THE NEANDERTHALS INVENT ABSTRACT ART [SOME 39,000 YEARS AGO] ?

A Neanderthal rock engraving inside a cave in Gibraltar. The discovery of geometric shapes carved into a cave in Gibraltar dating back more than 39,000 years is the earliest example of cave art of the Neanderthals, with researchers suggesting that these extinct cousins ​​of modern humans were also capable of abstraction. AFP PHOTO/ Stewart Finlayson.

A Neanderthal rock engraving inside a cave in Gibraltar. The discovery of geometric shapes carved into a cave in Gibraltar dating back more than 39,000 years is the earliest example of cave art of the Neanderthals, with researchers suggesting that these extinct cousins ​​of modern humans were also capable of abstraction. AFP PHOTO/ Stewart Finlayson.

February 25, 2015                                   New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.

OH NO …

In a previous post, “DID ABSTRACT ART EXIST 35,000 YEARS AGO? – THE CHAUVET CAVE“,  it appears that abstract art existed some 35,000 years ago. Then, in another post, “‘THE HAND OF THE DANCER” * – Cave Paintings in Indonesia Change Ideas about the Origin and Age of Oldest Art,” we reported that the earliest known cave paintings date back 40,000 years. “Early artists made them by carefully blowing paint around hands that were pressed tightly against the cave walls and ceilings. The oldest is at least 40,000 years old.” Now, it appears that “Abstract Art” was invented some 39,000 years ago – by the Neanderthals.

As reported by Art Daily,

“The discovery of geometric shapes carved into a cave in Gibraltar dating back more than 39,000 years is the earliest example of cave art of the Neanderthals, with researchers suggesting that these extinct cousins ​​of modern humans were also capable of abstraction.”

“Markings dating back 40,000 years suggest Neanderthals were considerably more sophisticated than previously thought, researchers say. They reached their conclusions after the discovery of engravings deep in Gorham’s Cave in Gibraltar — the first Neanderthal cave etchings found anywhere in the world. Are the deep grooves of horizontal and vertical criss-crossing lines art? Archaeologists are refusing to go that far, but they say, it shows Neanderthals — contrary to long-held beliefs — did possess the capacity for abstract thought and expression.”

“The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. The paper, “‘A rock engraving made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar,‘” was authored by a team that included specialists in the Neanderthal field such as professors Joaquin Rodriguez-Vidal, Francesco d’Errico and Francisco Giles Pacheco.

“‘The production of purposely made painted or engraved designs on cave walls is recognized as a major cognitive step in human evolution, considered exclusive to modern humans,” the authors wrote. D’Errico, of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), called it “the first example of cave art, an abstract representation made by Neanderthals and deeply engraved in the rock in a part of the cave they lived in.'”

Watch the video.

gorham's cave

 

“The carving, discovered after years of excavation at Gorham’s Cave, was eventually found beneath a Neanderthal sediment level that was itself discovered below a modern human sediment level. It was the first area of bedrock that was exposed by the researchers, suggesting there may be other engravings yet to be discovered. Not a casual mark Researchers also tried to learn how Neanderthals might have made the engraving.”

EFFORT REQUIRED

“‘They used stone Neanderthal tools to show that each groove required consistent, repetitive strokes in a single direction. “To produce one of the grooves required 60 strokes, always in one direction,” Finlayson said, adding that the whole of the etching required up to 317 strokes. “We were immediately showing that this was not a casual mark. This required effort.'”

“Close examination of the same cave in Gibraltar revealed that Neanderthals may have caught, butchered and cooked wild pigeons long before modern humans became regular consumers of bird meat, a study earlier this month said. Other recent studies have shown that in addition to meat, Neanderthals ate vegetables, berries and nuts, that they took care of their elders and used sophisticated bone tools.

“An enigmatic branch of the human family tree, Neanderthals lived in parts of Europe, Central Asia and Middle East for up to 300,000 years but vanished from the fossil record about 30-40,000 years ago.”

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

 

Leave a comment

PAPERS, PRESERVATION, MINUS PUBLISHERS

new york public library

New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.

A recent article in ArtDaily, has caused us to ask  “Where are the Book Publishers in Preservation?* (Ans. below.)

PRESERVATION

ArtDaily,The New York Public Library will soon digitize and make more accessible to the public 50,000 pages of historic early American manuscript material, courtesy of a $500,000 grant from The Polonsky Foundation.”

“The material will include portions of the papers of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, Noah Webster, James Madison, James Monroe and others, as well as other important items documenting life in the early United States.”

“The materials will be digitized over the next two years, preserving them for future generations and making them more accessible to the public through the Library’s new Archives Portal, developed by the Library’s NYPL Labs under the Leadership of Collections Strategy, and located at archives.nypl.org.”

UNIVERSAL ACCESS

“The portal provides direct access to digitized material directly via the online description. The digitized content can be discovered and viewed anywhere online, allowing the reader to zoom in to view minute page details, recreating the intimate experience of browsing boxes and folders in a physical archive.”

“So far, the Archives Portal includes descriptions of nearly 10,000 collections, representing over 50,000 feet of material. The comprehensive access to the archival and manuscript collections at NYPL made possible through the portal is a result of NYPL’s concentrated efforts over the last decade to make sure all of its unique archival collections are described and that the guides to these collections are available online. http://archives.nypl.org/collection/digital. Digitizing these materials not only allow scholars working around the world to study them remotely, but makes them more broadly accessible for the general public and easier to use for educational purposes. ”

MORE:

The Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford and the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (Vatican Library) have joined efforts in a landmark digitization project with the aim of opening up their repositories of ancient texts. Over the course of the next four years, 1.5 million pages from their remarkable collections will be made freely available online to researchers and to the general public.”

The Bodleian’s Gutenberg Bible (click, view the whole book)

 

“The initiative has been made possible by a £2 million award from the Polonsky Foundation. Dr Leonard Polonsky, who is committed to democratizing access to information, sees the increase of digital access to these two library collections — among the greatest in the world — as a significant step in sharing intellectual resources on a global scale.”

WHERE ARE ALL THE PUBLISHERS AT?

Q. Where are all the noted book publishers in this immense effort for preservation and access?

*A. Nowhere.

Q. Why?

A. ______________________.

 

Leave a comment

3e étage, the Paris Ballet, and the New Media

3e étage, Solistes et danseurs de l'Opéra de Paris

3e étage, Solistes et danseurs de l’Opéra de Paris

3e étage – Soloists and Dancers of the Paris Opera Ballet

“3e étage is a group that highlights the singularity of some of the most exceptional dancers from the Paris Opera Ballet in ingeniously structured shows, which allow them to unleash the full range of their prodigious capabilities.

Under the direction of choreographer Samuel Murez, these exciting artists bring a playful sensibility and irreverent touch to performances that take the spectator from classical masterpieces such as “Swan Lake” to acclaimed original works like the whimsical “Epiphénomènes”, as well as pieces by master choreographers such as William Forsythe and Roland Petit.”

3e étage, Dance & New Media

How can “dance” use the New Media, to make Dance vibrant, compelling, and have you wishing for more? The 3 videos below show 3e étage’s brilliant and creative use of the New Media. Creative use of the New Media does not mean “bells and whistles.”  Instead,  means first, a clean UI, second. a combination of movement and music, and third, intimate portrayals which brings the Dance to the person, and the person to the Dance.

3e étage has achieved all three of these objectives. See for yourself.

Killer Video 1

Killer Video 2

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/47465730″>Amouage | Interlude</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/bacchus”>Bacchus</a&gt; on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

 

Killer Video 3

 

Gallery, especially this one, a favorite: DANCER Lydie Vareilhes, PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Murez, PIECE Épiphénomènes, CHOREOGRAPHER Samuel Murez

_____________________________

3e étage has preformed at the Jacob’s Pillow Festival, Becket (Massachusetts), USA in 2011, and 2013.

 

Leave a comment

Listen to 60+ Free, High-Quality AudioBooks of Classic Literature on Spotify

New Post goes up Every Wednesday

Listen to 60+ Free, High-Quality AudioBooks of Classic Literature on Spotify: Austen, Dickens, Tolstoy & More*

* Or, “Where mainstream e-book publishers fear to tread.”

Re-blogged from OpenCulture, Feb. 4, 2015. OpenCulture remains one of the best blogs on the internet. 

 “Below, you’ll find Spotify links to more than 60 classic works of literature that, even if you struggled on getting them read in your English classes, you can now revisit in a perhaps much more lifestyle-compatible medium.”

To listen to any of these, you will of course need Spotify’s software and account, both easy to come by: you just download and register.

AND … 630 More Free Audio Books

For more great audio, don’t forget to visit our collection, 630 Free Audio Books: Download Great Books for Free. Also remember that you can download a free audiobook (including many contemporary books) fromAudible.com’s Free Trial program.

Leave a comment

80,000 video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3-D models, all freely available to anyone who wants to reuse copyright-free images and media.

The Public Domain Project, launched this week by royalty-free video marketplace Pond5, is a digital vault of 80,000 video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3-D models, all embeddable and freely available to anyone who wants to reuse copyright-free images and media. 

As explained by Carey Dunne in FastCode Design, on January 22, 2103,

“They’re impeccably organized, labeled, and tagged, so you can find just the type of clip or image you’re looking for.

Content ranges from historic photographs to footage of famous speeches to NASA imagery.

Among the gems on the site are 5,000 film clips that had previously been virtually inaccessible, living only in analog form in the National Archives outside of Washington.”

80,000 Media Assets Freely Available Via The Public Domain Project

Ms. Dunne continues,

“It can be hard for artists, designers, photo editors, and other creatives to track down Public Domain materials for their work. A number of resources offer copyright-free material—like Shutterstock or the National Archives—but none are so vast and localized as the Public Domain Project, launched this week by royalty-free video marketplace Pond5.

It’s a digital vault of 80,000 video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3-D models, all embeddable and freely available to anyone who wants to reuse copyright-free images and media. They’re impeccably organized, labeled, and tagged, so you can find just the type of clip or image you’re looking for. Content ranges from footage of turn-of-the-century New York City to Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech to Georges Méliès’ 1902 film, A Trip To The Moon.

Among the gems on the site are 5,000 film clips that had previously been virtually inaccessible, living only in analog form in the National Archives outside of Washington. The Public Domain Project has digitized these for the first time, thanks in part to the $61 million in funding Pond5 raised last year from Accel Partners and Stripes Group.”

Fine Art in the New Media

This project meets all of the criteria for Fine Art in the New Media as set forth on our Purpose Page,

“1. Fine Art in the new media is that it should be accessible, from the Google Art Project, and the new and dynamic Museum websites for the Louvre, the Metropolitan, the Musée d’Orsay, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Van Gogh Museum, and others so that, “There is [virtually] nothing between me and my Leonardo.”

2. Fine Art in the new media should be interactive, the zoom views of Google Art being a present prime example.

3. Fine Art in the new media should be viewer directed. “I want to see what I want to see.”

4. Fine Art in the new media should be able to be manipulated, which enables the viewer to use their creativity. to examine, adapt, and experiment with the art. In this sense, you can even make one of your pictures look like a Warhol .

5. Fine Art in the new media should be comparative , enabling the viewer to array pictures from different museums side by side to study technique, execution, and genre.

6. Lastly, Fine Art in the new media should be able to be viewed as a continuum. of humanity’s effort at visual expression.”

Pond5 also offers a handy video primer on what the Public Domain is, exactly, how content ends up in the Public Domain, and usage rights regarding its content:

H/T The Creator’s Project

Leave a comment

‘Touch Van Gogh’ app winner of the World Summit Award Mobile

van gogh app -2

 Fine Art and the New Media

The Van Gogh Museum continues to be in the forefront of using New Media tools to make Art accessible. The latest, as reported by Art Daily, is an app that “focusses on the communication with the public, before, during and after a visit to the museum.”

“The app ‘Touch Van Gogh’ is the winner of the World Summit Award Mobile in the ‘m-Tourism & Culture’ category and has been awarded ‘Gold’ in the ‘Best App’ category of the International Design and Communication Award (IDCA).”

Touch Van Gogh received highest scores in category that focusses on the communication with the public, before, during and after a visit to the museum.

“The app is designed for tablets and uses multi-touch functions to enable users the playfully discover information that is hidden in and underneath the paint.

For example, the old layer of varnish of the painting The Bedroom can be removed and users can discover that the painting Daubigny’s Garden was painted on a tea towel. This way, the outcome of complex technical research into Van Gogh’s painting practice has been made available to the general public.

View of the Garden

 

In June 2014, a further three paintings by Van Gogh were added to the app: The Cottage, Seascape near les-Saintes-Marie-de-la-Mer and Garden of the Asylum.” [Above]

IDCA Award The International Design and Communication Awards

“IDCA Award The International Design and Communication Awards (IDCA) focuses on creativity in the art and museum sector with respect to communication, design and branding. Touch Van Gogh received the highest scores in the category that focusses on the communication with the public, before, during and after a visit to the museum. In April, the Touch Van Gogh app received the Heritage In Motion Award in the ‘Apps for mobile devices’ category.”

The World Summit Awards

“The international competition World Summit Awards takes place every two years and focuses on the selection and promotion of apps that are most innovative and offer the most excellent interactive content. Herman van Oorschot, international expert on behalf of the World Summit Award Mobile, states that the Touch Van Gogh app has successfully past a critical test: “We selected four apps from the Netherlands that can compete on an international platform. After the 18 members of the jury from 18 countries of all the continents came to their decision, Touch Van Gogh was selected as one of the five winners in the m-Tourism & Culture category.””

Copyright © artdaily.org
Leave a comment

People Who Live In … See Inside Philip Johnson’s Glass House

“Above: Set on 49 secluded acres, the Glass House was the first of an eventual 14 structures that Johnson added to the compound, including an underground art gallery; a compact (and much more private) one-bedroom brick house for himself and longtime partner, curator David Whitney; and a red and black asymmetrical gate house he dubbed Da Monsta. Johnson spent 50-plus years living and working on the estate, until his death at 98 in 2005. And all the while, he also orchestrated its seemingly wild plantings, adding and subtracting trees, branches, and tendrils—and directing his crew with a megaphone—to create vistas worthy of a structure with all windows. As Paul Goldberger put it, “The elegantly arranged landscape is as much a part of the house as the furniture.”

The estate, now known as The Glass House, belongs to the National Trust for Historic Preservation and functions as a vital if under-the-radar museum offering contemporary art shows, events, tours (reservations required), plus a Glass House Design Store in downtown New Canaan.

1. Timeless design really can last a lifetime.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Johnson’s living room furniture is by his friend Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. (The Glass House itself was directly inspired by a model of Mies’s Farnsworth house in Illinois.) After seeing Mies’s German Pavilion at the International Exposition in Barcelona of 1929, Johnson ordered the furniture for his own New York living room and then used it in the Glass House. Once in place, not a single piece, down to the coffee table’s round ashtray and square box, ever changed (since the sixties, though, the stool has sported a cigarette burn left by Andy Warhol).

Note the intimate placement of the seating for easy conversation and the lounge option (in this house, comfort is welcomed in, if not allowed to reign supreme: “You can feel comfortable in any environment as long as it’s beautiful,” said Johnson).

2. There are all kinds of ways to build a wall.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: How to divide a glass cube into living, sleep, and eating quarters? Johnson built dual-function barriers, including a standing painting and a long wooden storage cupboard that sections off the bedroom (and ensures clutter-free living). The cabinet, which also serves as a headboard, holds blankets and bedding, tableware, and household supplies.

3. Display art at a human level.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Johnson purchased Nicolas Poussin’s 17th-century painting, The Burial of Phocion, at the recommendation of Alfred H. Barr, Jr., the Museum of Modern Art’s first director (Johnson himself served as MoMA’s first curator of architecture). The painting shows a landscape that uncannily evokes the pastoral scene on view from the windows. Its ingenious standing display easel is arranged so that the base meets the horizon line outside.

Painting stand detail from Philip Johnson's Glass House, photograph by Matthew Williams | Remodelista

Above: Johnson mounted the painting on a board and elevated it on a metal framework, an ideal solution for a house with no walls to hang things on (but, given the painting’s sun exposure, not exactly an archival approach).

4. Incorporate air space into your room design.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: The interior is just over 1,700 square feet (with 10 foot, 4 1/2 inch tall ceilings), and each part has plenty of breathing room. The seating area overlooks a dining table designed by Johnson and a papier-mâché maquette of Two Circus Women, a sculpture by Elie Nadelman. When Frank Lloyd Wright visited, he reportedly insisted the sculpture was out of place and moved it. After he left, Johnson put it right back. As he explained, “A room is only as good as you feel when you’re in it.”

5. Give in to window covers.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Though the Glass House isn’t visible from the road, Johnson eventually succumbed to sliding panels to block the sun and prevent interlopers from seeing inside—Yale architecture students were among the many known to appear uninvited for a look around. Johnson’s woven window panels are from Conrad, which still specializes in custom sun shades. The ones in the house are similiar to the company’s Toksu grass design.

6. Cover up what you don’t want to display.

Detail of the Glass House kitchen by Philip Johnson, photographed by Matthew Williams | Remodelista

Above: How to plunk a working kitchen into an eyesore-free, open-plan room? Johnson devised a compact but extremely functional galley—and then he figured out a way to make it disappear.

The house's compact, and extremely functional kitchen transforms into a martini bar and buffet, thanks to an ingenious hinged walnut counter that folds on top of the stove and sink.

Above: Presto chango: A hinged walnut top (with rubber-footed legs) folds down over the sink and stove, turning the space into a martini bar and buffet. During the museum’s parties at the house, it’s still put to use.

The Glass House kitchen by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: As for the appliances, Johnson turned to Kitchens by Dean, in New Canaan, for his stainless steel sink, GE fridge, freezer, 24-inch stove, and wooden cabinets—all tidily tucked under the counter. To give the setup unity and an industrial look, Johnson painted it all gray.

Teema dinnerware at The Glass House by Philip Johnson, photograph by Matthew Williams | Remodelista

Above: For coffee and tea, the kitchen is stocked with a Chemex coffee maker and the Teema collection of pared-down tableware by Finnish designer Kaj Franck—like the Glass House, Franck’s ceramics are based on square, circular, and rectangular shapes. Of course, Johnson always kept his wares in a kitchen cabinet when not in use. (Read about Teema in Object Lessons; the pieces shown here are available at the Glass House Store.)

7. Brick makes interesting, durable flooring. (And it works well with radiant heat.)

The Glass House herringbone brick floor by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Is it time to rediscover herringbone brick? The Glass House’s floor is more indestructible than wood (if not easier on the legs). And it conducts heat well—the house has a hydronic radiant-heat system in which hot water flows through piping under the bricks. Go to Remodeling 101 to learn 5 Things to Know about Radiant Floor Heating.  And see Brick Makes a Comeback for an interesting use of brick in a contemporary remodel, herringbone floors included.

8. A curve or two is pleasing to the eye.

Circular fireplace in The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: The house’s only fully enclosed room is a brick cylinder that serves on one side as a fireplace. When embers are lit, the room’s cross breeze is said to ignite the fire.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: On the other side, the cylinder contains a bathroom conveniently right off the bedroom. “You haven’t any straight lines in your body. Why should we have straight lines in architecture?” said Johnson. “You’d be surprised when you go into a room that has no straight line how marvelous it is that you can feel the walls talking back to you, as it were.”

Circular bathroom in The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: The bathroom has a curved wood door and frame (with faint marks on it from Johnson’s wheelchair during his last stays in the house).

9. Consider a full-length medicine cabinet.

Bathroom in The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Sheathed in pale green Italian glass tiles, the bathroom’s storage is cleverly tucked into its outsize medicine cabinet. For a similar design, consider Restoration Hardware’s Frame Metal Full-Length Medicine Cabinet. Urban Archaeology carries a range of Glass Tiles (but be warned: We’ve heard that the edges of glass tiles can be razor sharp and require a lot of filing).

10. Apply texture in unexpected places.

Bathroom in The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Johnson loved to experiment with materials: He built an open-air Ghost House on the property from chain link fencing; constructed Da Monsta from gunite, a plasterlike swimming pool composite; and applied leather tiles on the bathroom ceiling. True, they’re not practical for a small space with high humidity, but because Johnson and Whitney more often showered in the brick house across from the Glass House, the leather has held up.

Shower drain in The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: The shower has a shades-of-Pompeii circular tiled frame and a curtain on a metal ceiling track.

11. A bedroom doesn’t need much more than a bed.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: A 1927 Mies van der Rohe glass-and-tubular-steel table stands next to a ghost of a bed cloaked in a woven cotton spread that Johnson brought back from a trip to Greece. For simplicity of line, all else, including pillows, is kept in the surrounding cupboards. Johnson’s dictum: “Pick very few objects and place them exactly.”

The windows were sized according to the largest panels of glass available at the time and the lower panels are chair-rail height. Waking up to a snowstorm is one of the biggest thrills. SeeBedtime Under Glass for a report by Guy Trebay of the New York Times, who not so long ago got to test out a night at the house.

Cabinet detail from Philip Johnson's Glass House, photograph by Matthew Williams | Remodelista

Above: The cupboards have simple patinated brass knobs.

Windwo detail from Philip Johnson's Glass House, photograph by Matthew Williams | Remodelista

Above: The windows are steel-framed and secured with brass hardware.

The Glass House bedroom with bedding from Rough Linen | Remodelista

Above: When there are overnight guests, the bed is dressed in its new Rough Linen bedding.

The Glass House bedroom with new bedding from Rough Linen | Remodelista

Above: The duvet cover is Rough Linen’s Orkney design, paired with the company’s Simple Pillow Slips and St. Barts Blue Shams and a white linen Sheet. On arrival at the house, the company’s creator, Tricia Rose, immediately whipped the bed into shape. She used her 7 Secrets to Make a Perfect Bed—but refrained from diving in naked.

12. Layer your lighting.

The Glass House uplight detail by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Alongside exposed steel I-beams, each corner of the house is lit by canister lights. After moving in, Johnson hired lighting designer Richard Kelly to minimize glare and save him from having to stare at his own reflection after dark. Kelly responded by creating a subtle system of interior up lights and exterior down lights.

13. Plants make good roommates.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: A spindly pencil cactus brings the outdoors in and keeps the room from feeling chilly. It stands next to a Mies van der Rohe tubular steel and leather desk and Brno Chair. On Gardenista, join our debate about Plants in the Bedroom and learn about Johnson’s succulent of choice in the New “It” Houseplant.

14. Borrow freely from others.

The Glass House by Philip Johnson in New Canaan Connecticut photographed by Matthew Williams |  Remodelista

Above: Johnson openly grabbed the idea for an all-glass house from Mies van der Rohe—he even managed to get his built first—and found inspiration all over, from antiquity to the Bauhaus to Frank Gehry’s aversion to right angles. He encouraged people to design their own houses and, while doing so, to borrow brazenly: “I got everything from someone. Nobody can be original. As Mies said, ‘I don’t want to be original. I want to be good.'”

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 122 other followers

%d bloggers like this: