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Misty Copeland – Fine Art in the New Media

January 18, 2017 New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday by Jack Dziamba

Misty Copeland

“Misty Copeland is an American ballet dancer for American Ballet Theatre, one of the three leading classical ballet companies in the United States. Her style, grace, passion, and skills have gotten her to the top, and made her the 1st African-American woman to be promoted in the ABT’s 75-year history! ” Ovation*, May 31, 2016.

The Dance – Fine Art in the New Media

The New Media tool of You Tube has made it possible to present an inside view of Misty Copeland and her amazing career. While You Tube has be- come ubiquitous, and often taken for granted, this media has opened up the world of Fine Art, in this case The Dance, for  everyone,everywhere.

The two clips in this post brings everyone into the inside world of the great ballet dancer, Misty Copeland. The second clip also allows everyone, everywhere to see the full movie from Sundance. And, of course, there are a number of other clips of Misty Copeland via You Tube.

More: Misty Copeland Dances Romeo + Juliet, Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux & White Swan at Vail Dance 2015

*Ovation is America’s only arts television network, whose mission is to connect the world to all forms of art and artistic expression.

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Four Ways of Looking at Art – Monet’s “Wheatstacks”

Claude Monet - Meule 1891

Claude Monet – Meule 1891

FINE ART IN THE NEW MEDIA

Here are four ways of looking at art, in this case, Claude Monet’s Meule, through the New Media tools of the internet which, when put together, present a new and exciting way of looking at art.

1. The first, above, is by an image of the work itself. The next two are videos, and the fourth is by a [wall]text, which you might see in a museum, in a book or on the internet.

2.

Claude Monet – Meule, 1891

 3.

Claude Monet – Meule, 1891

4. “Haystacks [Wheatstacks] is a title of a series of impressionist paintings by Claude Monet. The primary subjects of all of the paintings in the series are stacks of hay in the field after the harvest season. The title refers primarily to a twenty-five canvas series (Wildenstein Index Number 1266-1290) begun in the end of summer of 1890 and continued through the following spring, using that year’s harvest. Some use a broader definition of the title to refer to other paintings by Monet with this same theme. The series is known for its thematic use of repetition to show differences in perception of light across various times of day, seasons, and types of weather. The subjects were painted in fields near Monet’s home and gardens in Giverny, France.”The series is among Monet’s most notable works. Although the largest collections of Monet’s work is held in Paris at the Musée d’Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet, other notable Monet collections are in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Metropolitan Museum and Museum of Modern Art in New York, and at the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo. Six of the twenty-five haystacks pieces in this series are currently housed at the Art Institute of Chicago. Other museums that hold parts of this series in their collection include: the Getty Center in Los Angeles, the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, Connecticut (which also has one of five from the earlier 1888-9 harvest),  the National Gallery of Scotland,  the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Kunsthaus Zürich, and the Shelburne Museum, Vermont. Several private collections also hold Haystack paintings.” (Wikipedia)

January 11, 2017 by Jack Dziamba. New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.
 
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THE BAUHAUS, a Comprehensive New Digital Resource, Launched by the Harvard Art Museums

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                                                                                                                       Image: Harvard Art Museums

Fine Art in the New Media

This blog is devoted to reporting on The Book and Fine Art in the New Media. It discusses the use of New Media tools to fulfill the mission of making art accessible to everyone, everywhere. The use of New Media tools does not have to be “lights, bells and whistles.” Instead, it looks at elements such as ease of use, seamless interface and others*. Our first Post of 2017 is The Bauhaus,** a comprehensive new digital resource launched by the Harvard Art Museums.

As stated on The Bauhaus website,

“The Harvard Art Museums have unveiled a new online resource dedicated to the Bauhaus, expanding access to one of the first and largest Bauhaus collections in the world. The Bauhaus Special Collection, available at harvardartmuseums.org/collections/special-collections/the-bauhaus, supports understanding of and scholarship on the 20th century’s most influential school of art and design … ”

“The digital resource relates to a broader Bauhaus project that will culminate in a major exhibition and related programming across the Harvard campus in 2019 on the occasion of the centennial anniversary of the founding of the school.”

“This new online special collection gives access to the records of more than 32,000 Bauhaus-related objects in the museums’ holdings, including paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, photography, textiles, and other media.”

Ease of Use – All 32,696 Works

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Here is a look at some of the sections

Chronology

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The Holdings

screen-shot-2017-01-03-at-7-07-05-pm“The Holdings section presents a new way of looking at the Harvard Art Museums’ Bauhaus-related works, enabling easier access to online records of objects. Topics in this section group objects by different facets of the school, allowing a researcher to navigate the collections by media (painting and sculpture, photography, etc.), by discipline (architecture), and by theme, such as “The Bauhaus at Harvard,” “Pedagogy,” and “Typography,” in order to discover new material.”

Below are screen shots of some of the sections in the Holdings.

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Additional Features

“The Bauhaus Special Collection also includes a comprehensive list of Bauhaus-related archives and exhibitions held across Harvard and an extensive bibliography. An annotated map shows the locations of institutions and archives affiliated with the school in and around Boston, as well as architectural points of interest, including the Gropius House in Lincoln, the John F. Kennedy Federal Building, and many lesser-known projects. These resources should fuel future Bauhaus research and catalyze new engagement with the collection, particularly through the museums’ Art Study Center.”

The Bauhaus is another fine example of the use of the New Media to bring art to all.

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About the Bauhaus

“Created by architect Walter Gropius, the Bauhaus promoted collaboration across creative disciplines, and between artists, architects, and craftsmen, as part of a utopian project of designing a new world.”
“Modernists such as Josef and Anni Albers, Feininger, Kandinsky, Klee, Moholy-Nagy, and Oskar Schlemmer taught in the school’s various workshops, realigning hierarchies of high and low by embracing new technologies, materials, and media, and exploring cosmopolitan forms of communal living. Though the school officially existed for only 14 years (from 1919 to 1933, during the years of Germany’s Weimar Republic), its influence has been far-reaching, extending into the ways we live, teach, and learn today.” (Harvard Art Museums)

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* Fine Art in the New Media

1. Fine Art in the new media  should be accessible, from the Google Art Project, and the new and dynamic Museum websites for the Louvre, the Metropolitan, the Musée d’Orsay, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Van Gogh Museum, and others so that, “There is [virtually] nothing between me and my Leonardo.”

2. Fine Art in the new media should be interactive, the zoom views of Google Art being a present prime example:

3. Fine Art in the new media should be viewer directed. “I want to see what I want to see.”

4. Fine Art in the new media should be able to be manipulated, which enables the viewer to use their creativity. to examine, adapt, and experiment with the art. In this sense, you can even make one of your pictures look like a Warhol .

5. Fine Art in the new media should be comparative , enabling the viewer to array pictures from different museums side by side to study technique, execution, and genre.

6. Lastly, Fine Art in the new media should be able to be viewed as a continuum. of man’s effort at visual expression.(whitherthebook)

** The Bauhaus movement began in 1919 when Walter Gropius founded a school with a vision of bridging the gap between art and industry by combining crafts and fine arts. (Bauhaus Movement)

January 4, 2017 by Jack Dziamba

 

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2017 – The Merger of Science and Art – The Universe and Beyond …

December 28, 2016 by Jack Dziamba. New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.
 Vincent Van Gogh, "Starry Night."

Vincent Van Gogh, Starry Night.

SCIENCE AND ART

Often a false dichotomy serves as the basis for much of the debate in Economics, Politics, and even in Science, and Art. The false dichotomy wrongly assumes that the answer is either this or that – there are only two alternatives, and that they are mutually exclusive. Oceans of print and a whole universe of bits and bytes are devoted to the myth of a false dichotomy. This is true in the realms of Science and Art. The false dichotomy is that there is only one nature to “reality” the scientific, not the artistic. The conventional wisdom is that the two are mutually exclusive. Enter the Universe.

THE UNIVERSE

The universe is a perfect example of the false dichotomy between Science and Art.  One need only look.  A recent article,  by Ethan Siegel,  Hubble’s Shining View Of Deep Space Beyond The Stars,” Ethan Siegelin the 12/26/16 issue of Forbes serves to illuminate the point.As Siegel writes, “From any point on Earth’s surface, a clear night sky reveals a treasure trove of stars and deep-sky objects.”

Landmarks of the southern skies, along with the location of the GOODS-S ERS field. Image credit: A. Fujii; illustration by NASA, ESA, and Z. Levay (STScI).

Landmarks of the southern skies, along with the location of the GOODS-S ERS field. Image credit: A. Fujii; illustration by NASA, ESA, and Z. Levay (STScI).

“Through a powerful telescope, billions of objects become visible, from stars and nebulae to the galaxies beyond our own.

With the success of the Hubble deep fields in revealing distant, hitherto unseen galaxies, 2010 brought a new camera and a new ambition.”

Galaxies from the present day to when the Universe was just 5% of its current age are all visible together in this stunning view of the Universe. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O'Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute).

Galaxies from the present day to when the Universe was just 5% of its current age are all visible together in this stunning view of the Universe. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute).

“The installation of the Wide Field Camera 3 enabled simultaneously large, deep views of space as never before.”

Cosmic rarities, like merging galaxies (top) and gravitational lensing phenomena (middle) can be seen at various points in the image. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O'Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute). Image was cropped and enhanced by E. Siegel, and credits are the same for the rest of the images in this post.

Cosmic rarities, like merging galaxies, and gravitational lensing phenomena can be seen at various points in the image. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute). Image was cropped and enhanced by E. Siegel.

 

“Diffraction spikes indicate stars within the Milky Way, with vastly more distant galaxies visible in the abyss beyond.

Bright objects with diffraction spikes are stars within our own galaxy; everything else imaged is a galaxy beyond our own

The bluest galaxies house intense star formation, while the reddest galaxies appear so because the expanding Universe stretches the light’s wavelength. Some regions of this mosaic clearly demonstrate a total dearth of foreground, Milky Way stars. These regions provide the best windows into the distant Universe.” (Siegel)

YES, BUT IS IT ART?

Although over 7,500 galaxies were uncovered in this mosaic, over ten times as many are likely yet to be seen.

As many galaxies are revealed here are just the brightest and most easily seen ones. Less than 10% of what's out there is revealed by GOODS. Infrared telescopes , like the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are required to view the rest. The JWST will reveal the Universe even more deeply.

As many galaxies are revealed here are just the brightest and most easily seen ones. Less than 10% of what’s out there is revealed by GOODS. Infrared telescopes , like the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are required to view the rest. The JWST will reveal the Universe even more deeply.

MORE:

The Universe and Art, Mori Museum

 

 

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The White Marble Sculptures of Ancient Greece

December 21, 2016 by Jack Dziamba. New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday

The Colors of Ancient Greece

Tracing the Colors of Ancient Sculpture- Science and Art – Getty Museum

Using ultraviolet and raking light, archaeologist Vinzenz Brinkmann examines marble sculptures of Athena and Paris from the Temple of Aphaia, now in the Glyptothek in Munich. In the process, he reveals examples of physical evidence used to inform the recreations of the original color design and paint.

White marble sculptures of antiquity | Harvard Magazine

‘“I knew, of course, that Greek and Roman sculpture was once painted,”’says Susanne Ebbinghaus, Hanfmann curator of ancient art at the Harvard University Art Museums, “but there is a big difference between this abstract notion and actually attempting to imagine what the sculptures might have looked like.”’ Gods in Color: Painted Sculpture of Classical Antiquity the Arthur M. Sackler Museum.

‘“We now assume that almost all Greek marble sculpture was painted,” she says. “These reconstructions can only be approximations,” but at least they dispel a popular misconception—that most statues of antiquity were plain old white. Plain would not be thought ideal until the Renaissance.’

“Organized by Munich’s Stiftung Archäologie and the Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, the exhibition drew crowds at home in 2004 and then began traveling. Athenians in long lines were fascinated and shocked. In Hamburg, says Ebbinghaus, some museum-goers proclaimed that Classical art was now dead for them.”

More

Above: Athena, from the same temple and of the same date. Reconstruction has been restricted to areas whose original appearance may be determined with some certainty.

Above: Athena, from the Temple of Alphia, Agenia, Greek, c. 490-480 B.C. Reconstruction has been restricted to areas whose original appearance may be determined with some certainty. (Harvard Magazine)

 

 

 Above: Trojan archer from the Temple of Aphaia on Aegina, Greek, c. 490-480 B.C. He is probably Paris, who killed Achilles with an arrow to that famous heel. He wears the costume of the Scythians of central Asia.


Above: Trojan archer from the Temple of Aphaia on Aegina, Greek, c. 490-480 B.C. He is probably Paris, who killed Achilles with an arrow to that famous heel. He wears the costume of the Scythians of central Asia. (Harvard Magazine)

Above: The “Peplos” kore, Greek, c. 530 B.C., Acropolis Museum, Athens. The version at right was done first and drew criticism from those who say that the ancients painted only ornaments and details, never a whole sculpture. The second version is limited to colors that can be determined surely. “If there is color preserved on the hair of statues of Greek women and some men,” notes curator Susanne Ebbinghaus, “it is red. The red must have served as a base color, and so the yellow kore has been given brown hair.”

Above: The “Peplos” kore, Greek, c. 530 B.C., Acropolis Museum, Athens. The version at right was done first and drew criticism from those who say that the ancients painted only ornaments and details, never a whole sculpture. The second version is limited to colors that can be determined surely. “If there is color preserved on the hair of statues of Greek women and some men,” notes curator Susanne Ebbinghaus, “it is red. The red must have served as a base color, and so the yellow kore has been given brown hair.”  (Harvard Magazine)

 

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SEASONS GREETINGS ART DECO

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Elton John’s Extraordinary Modernist Photography Collection at Tate Modern

December 7, 2016. New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday, by Jack Dziamba
Man Ray, glasstears les larme (Glass Tears)

Man Ray, glasstears les larme (Glass Tears)

Elton John’s extraordinary  collection  of modernist photography is on exhibit at Tate Modern, until May 7, 2017.

The BBC has published  an article along with stunning images from the exhibition.Some of those images are shown below, in a large format so that the viewer may be able to see the full impact of the photograph.

The BBC article contains a description of how Elton John, on coming out of rehab,  first noticed photography as an art form, and what it means to him. Here are some excerpts:

“Photographs from Sir Elton John collection on show at Tate Modern, The Radical Eye,  include portraits, still life and experimental techniques, from the 1920s through to the 1950s. Sir Elton calls photography “‘one of the most important and progressive art forms of the 20th century”‘.
Sir Elton started buying photographs after coming out of rehab in 1990. ‘”It’s a much healthier addiction to buy photographs, so I just switched,'” he says in the exhibition catalogue. He owns about 8,000 images in his personal collection dating from 1910 to the present day.”
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Sir Elton says the photographers were “going where no other photographer had gone before. I consider them true adventurers and what they did was extraordinary”. This nude is by Edward Weston.
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“There are 25 images by Man Ray, a leading figure in the Dada and Surrealist movements, in the show – including t{he one  at the top of this page titled Glass Tears (Les Larmes) 1932. Sir Elton set a world record for a photograph sold at auction when he paid £125,000 for it.”
There are far more photographs in the exhibition than are shown here. Many can  seen on the Tate Modern site,”including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton. With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko. 
CBS has a facinatinating video of Sir Elton talking about his collection.  Be sure to watch it. The collection includes “Falling Man” from the World Trade Center disaster.
Tate Modern, “The Radical Eye,” Bankside, London, SE1 9TG, until May 7, 2017.
H/T Joshua Cohen
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