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The Largest Exhibition on Ancient Greece Ever Produced in North America

 The Greeks – Agamemnon to Alexander the Great

From December 12th 2014 to April 26th 2015

Pointe-à-Callière Presents the World Première of the Largest Exhibition on Ancient Greece Ever Produced in North America

MONTREAL.- Pointe-à-Callière, the Montréal Archaeology and History Complex, is presenting the world premiere of the original exhibition The Greeks – Agamemnon to Alexander the Great. The exhibition spans over 5,000 years of Greek history and culture and takes visitors on an exceptional and fascinating journey back to the origins of the cradle of Western civilization, its heritage and the traces it has left in the hearts and minds of the Greek people.

From the Museum’s website,

Alexander, larger than life
“The exhibition takes us all the way up to the days of Alexander the Great, a larger-than-life figure who was only 20 years old when his father, Philip II, was assassinated. But Alexander was ready to succeed him, thanks to his education, his training and the formidable Macedonian army. Within barely a single generation, the ancient world was transformed from a series of independent city-states into a unified empire under Alexander the Great. The young prince who became king, emperor then god in the eyes of the world, died of a malignant fever at the age of 32. But his legend survived, as did Greece’s extraordinary legacy to the Western world.”

The Golden Age of Ancient Greece
“Between these two crucial figures, the exhibition focuses on the Golden Age of ancient Greece, in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, when philosophy, theatre and the visual arts flourished, particularly in Athens. This was also the birthplace, under Pericles, of Greece’s greatest gift to humanity: democracy, government by the people. For the first time, citizens could express themselves, debate issues and vote. The exhibition also looks at the founding of the Olympic Games in 776 BCE, when athletes converged in Olympia from all Greek city states to take part in the Games.”

6--KoreView Items from the Exhibition on the Museum’s Website

A hands-on experience
“The exhibition offers visitors a whole range of interactives and items to handle. They can touch different reproductions including a Cycladic female figurine, a block of marble, a warrior’s helmet and a sword. There are over twenty videos in the various exhibition zones, most of them produced by the National Geographic Society, the Acropolis Museum in Athens, the Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens and the Canadian Museum of History.”

 

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WHAT WAS PHOTOGRAPHY LIKE IN THE 1920s?

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March 18, 2015 –  New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday

The Thomas Walther Collection at MoMA New York

From the MOMA website,

“The creative possibilities explored through photography were never richer or more varied than in the years between the First and Second World Wars, when photographers approached figuration, abstraction, and architecture with unmatched imaginative fervor. This vital moment is dramatically captured in the more than 300 photographs that constitute the Thomas Walther Collection at The Museum of Modern Art.”

Jonas Cuénin, in the March 17, 2015 issue of L’Oeil de la Photographie, (The Eye of Photography) wrote about the exhibition at MOMA featuring the Photography from the 1920s, quoting from the Director’s Forward   by  Glenn D. Lowry, Director, The Museum of Modern Art

“The 1920s were a prosperous era when photography seemed ubiquitous, defying the restrictions of the past, including photography’s justification as an art in itself.

That decade also saw the arrival of new hardware, like compact, portable 35mm cameras with fast shutter speeds, and figures like László Moholy-Nagy were reinventing the photogram at the Bauhaus school, preaching that every aspiring artist should be “literate” in photography, much as every student today needs computer skills.

Berlin and Paris became magnets for photojournalists and editors eager to rethink what could be done with images and text on the blank pages of books and magazines.”

FINE ART IN THE NEW MEDIA

The The Thomas Walther Collection exhibition promises to be one of the high points in a museum showing of photograph. This blog concentrates on Fine Art in the New Media, and the use of technology to fulfill the mission to make Art available to everyone, wherever they may be. In this respect, the interactive web site by MOMA is one of the high points in a museum’s use of New Technology to further the mission of making Art accessible to everyone.

First just clicking on the link above will bring you immediately into the stunning photography of the 1920s.

Second, the contents of the exhibition is viewed with a simple but elegant user interface organized into xx sections, VisualizationsTechniques, where the visitor can click on tabs such as Distractions, for an essay on “The Age of Distraction: Photography and Film,” or on Gallery to see some 341 pictures from the exhibition, in great resolution, and with the ability to click to enlarge each one. This is exemplary because the Gallery is not a small sample of the images in the exhibition, but it contains a substantial number (341) of the images in the museum exhibition, available to all, to be viewed for a long a period of time as the viewer wants, from anywhere in the world. Photographs organized by Artist is also just a click away. You can also see the image organized by Schools and Circles of Influence. Here’s an essay, for example on The Poetics of Eye and Lens, with stunning images of this Theme.

Third, well, there is lots more, but a note on the Catalogue will illustrate the point about the Museum’s use of New Media and New Technology, where you can download a free sample of a full 35 pages of the catalogue.

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OBJECT:PHOTO. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909-1949
Mitra Abbaspour, Lee Ann Daffner, Maria Morris Hambourg

BONUS

Click on an image below to view  it in a New Tab

 

  • Willi Ruge (German, 1882-1961). Seconds before Landing from the series I Photograph Myself during a Parachute Jump. 1931. Gelatin silver print. 8 1/16 × 5 9/16″ (20.4 × 14.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther
  • Gertrud Arndt (German, 1903–2000). At the Masters’ Houses. 1929–30. Gelatin silver print. 8 7/8 x 6 1/4″ (22.6 x 15.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
  • Herbert Bayer (American, born Austria. 1900–1985). Humanly Impossible. 1932. Gelatin silver print. 15 5/16 x 11 9/16″ (38.9 x 29.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Acquired through the generosity of Howard Stein © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
  • Max Burchartz (German, 1887–1961). Lotte (Eye). 1928. Gelatin silver print. 11 7/8 x 15 3/4″ (30.2 x 40 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Acquired through the generosity of Peter Norton © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
  • Alvin Langdon Coburn (American, 1882–1966). The Octopus. 1909. Gelatin silver print. 22 1/8 x 16 3/4″ (56.2 x 42.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther
  • Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975). Votive Candles, New York City. 1929–30. Gelatin silver print. 8 1/2 x 6 15/16″ (21.6 x 17.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Willard Van Dyke and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Barr, Jr., by exchange © 2014 Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • André Kertész (American, born Hungary. 1894–1985). Mondrian’s Glasses and Pipe. 1926. Gelatin silver print. 3 1/8 x 3 11/16″ (7.9 x 9.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Grace M. Mayer Fund © 2014 Estate of André Kertész
  • Edmund Kesting (German, 1892–1970). Glance to the Sun. 1928. Gelatin silver print. 13 1/16 x 14 1/2″ (33.2 x 36.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther © 2014 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
  • Lucia Moholy (American, born Hungary. 1895–1946). Florence Henri. 1927. Gelatin silver print. 14 5/8 x 11″ (37.2 x 27.9 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
  • Aleksandr Rodchenko (Russian, 1891–1956). Girl with a Leica. 1932–33. Gelatin silver print. 11 13/16 x 8″ (30 x 20.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Shirley C. Burden, by exchange
  • Osamu Shiihara (Japanese, 1905–1974). Construction of Hand. 1932–41. Gelatin silver print. 11 7/8 x 8 7/8″ (30.2 x 22.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther © 2014 Estate of Osamu Shiihara, care of Tomatsu Shiihara, Japan
  • Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz (Polish, 1885–1939). Anna Oderfeld, Zakopane. 1911–12. Gelatin silver print. 6 11/16 x 4 3/4″ (17 x 12.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Mrs. Willard Helburn, by exchange.
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THE GARDNER MUSEUM ART HEIST – 25 YEARS LATER – A VIRTUAL TOUR

gardner-2

New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday

On 25th anniversary of theft, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum honors 13 missing artworks with virtual tour.

“This week the Museum launched a virtual tour, Thirteen Works: Explore the Gardner’s Stolen Art, on its website. Using Google Art, high-resolution images of the artwork, and archival images, the tour will explore the history of the artworks and how Isabella Stewart Gardner acquired them.”

Re-blogged from ArtDaily

“BOSTON, MASS.- Twenty-five years after thieves stole 13 invaluable artworks from its collection, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum honors the missing works with a virtual tour exploring each one of them, along with lectures about the theft by the Museum’s security director. ‘Although a quarter century has passed since the art was stolen, we have always been determined to recover it and we remain optimistic that we will.’ said Anne Hawley, the Gardner Museum’s Director. ‘On this anniversary, we will honor the missing artworks. They are an irreplaceable part of our cultural heritage, and we want to keep them present in the minds of the public.’

In partnership with the FBI and U.S. Attorney’s office, the Gardner Museum’s investigation to recover the missing artworks, which were stolen over the course of an 81-minute robbery in the early morning hours of March 18, 1990, remains open and active. This month, the Museum will mark the anniversary of the theft in three ways:

VIRTUAL TOUR

This week the Museum launched a virtual tour, Thirteen Works: Explore the Gardner’s Stolen Art, on its website. Using Google Art, high-resolution images of the artwork, and archival images, the tour will explore the history of the artworks and how Isabella Stewart Gardner acquired them.

The museum will also highlight the artworks on its social media channels in the days leading up to March 18. · On March 18 and March 26, Anthony Amore, the Gardner Museum’s Director of Security, will deliver a lecture, ’81 Minutes,’ where he will walk audiences through the events of 25 years ago. (The March 18 lecture will be open to museum members only.)

The Museum’s docents will now include a discussion of the theft and the missing artworks in their introductions to the Museum and tours of the collection, which are offered to the public on most days that the Museum is open.

REWARD

The Museum is offering a reward of $5 million, guaranteed by its Board of Trustees, for information leading to the recovery of the works in good condition. The Museum encourages anyone with information about the location of the stolen artworks to contact Amore directly at 617-278-5114 or theft@gardnermuseum.org.

‘Most of the time when great masterpieces are stolen and recovered, recovery happens either immediately or a generation later,” said Amore. “We are working hard every day to follow every lead and find these artworks. We continue to partner closely on the investigation with the FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s office, who share our resolve to bring these artworks home.”‘

 

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ANDY WARHOL’S BOOKS – BEFORE THE DIGITAL AGE

 

 Andy Warhol, A Gold Book, 1957. Courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

March 4, 2015     New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday

ANDY’S BOOKS

From his student days in the 1940s until his death in 1987,  Before the age of digital books, and e-readers,Warhol experimented wildly with form and content, turning traditional notions of media and authorship on their heads. 

Now, the first US exhibition to concentrate on Andy Warhol’s book work, “Warhol by the Book”. opens at the Williams College Museum of Art March 7 and will be on view through August 16, 2015. The museum’s website states that,

“He co-produced a satirical cookbook mocking fashionable French recipes; held coloring parties for crowdsourcing his own promotional books; and designed a pop-up “children’s book for hipsters” featuring sound recordings, holograms, and a do-it-yourself nose job.”

As described by ArtDaily,

“Nearly 500 objects covering more than 80 book titles including unique and unpublished materials come together from WCMA and The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. The exhibition showcases a range of material from Warhol’s practice including paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and artist’s books. It also includes projections of sixteen Screen Test portrait-films of writers. Warhol had a lifelong fascination with the written word and with the book as an art form.”

“Featuring drawings created to fulfill college assignments, to the Party Book, which was in development at the time of his death, Warhol by the Book traces the artist’s ideas, influences, collaborations, and innovations throughout his career. ‘Printed books were essential in Warhol’s daily life and with almost every known example of his work for books represented, this exhibition demonstrates his prolific and diverse contribution to the field of publishing,’ says Matt Wrbican, Chief Archivist, The Andy Warhol Museum and Curator of Warhol by the Book.”

“Featured in the exhibition are: 

– Many unfinished works such as a unique maquette for a book made from his Marilyn Monroe prints which unfolds to a length of almost 30 feet ⦁

– Unique Red Books of Warhol’s Polaroid photographs of his celebrity friends including Mick Jagger ⦁

– Never-before exhibited paste-up layouts for two books of photos: Andy Warhol’s Exposures and America.”

– Works related to Warhol’s interest in Truman Capote, the subject of Warhol’s first solo exhibition in 1952 ⦁

– Illustrations in mass-market children’s books, a language instruction book, a cook book, and an etiquette book.”

THE BOOK PROJECTS
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WHAT WARHOL WOULD DO NOW IN THE DIGITAL AGE

As stated in the Purpose Page of this blog,

“THE BOOK, both print and even current versions of the electronic reader, are already near artifacts. Book publishing is in the death throes of the last century, bound up in static, linear publications. At the same time, the technology of the new media has developed to such a degree of creativity and innovation that Alice Rawsthorn commented in the New York Times of November 28, 2010 that”

“‘These devices offer thrilling possibilities for us to do much more than read words on a screen, and it is deeply               disappointing that so few designers and publishers are embracing them.'”

ArtDaily,

Many of Warhol’s projects focused on the book as an object. He blended the borders of art, design, and text. Andy Warhol’s Index (Book) (1967), was the first of several books to defy the definition of a book. This seminal publication has been called a “children’s book for hipsters,” complete with sound recordings, balloons, fold-outs, holograms, and even a do-it-yourself nose job. Three preliminary mock-ups for this project are featured from WCMA’s collection, showing how the book changed from inception to its final state. Further playing with form and content Warhol produced a novel from transcriptions of audiotapes, which is exhibited with the very cassette recorder used to make the recordings, and Stephen Shore’s photos that document the sessions.”

Imagine what Andy Warhol would do now with the technology and tools of the digital age.

 

 

 

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DID THE NEANDERTHALS INVENT ABSTRACT ART [SOME 39,000 YEARS AGO] ?

A Neanderthal rock engraving inside a cave in Gibraltar. The discovery of geometric shapes carved into a cave in Gibraltar dating back more than 39,000 years is the earliest example of cave art of the Neanderthals, with researchers suggesting that these extinct cousins ​​of modern humans were also capable of abstraction. AFP PHOTO/ Stewart Finlayson.

A Neanderthal rock engraving inside a cave in Gibraltar. The discovery of geometric shapes carved into a cave in Gibraltar dating back more than 39,000 years is the earliest example of cave art of the Neanderthals, with researchers suggesting that these extinct cousins ​​of modern humans were also capable of abstraction. AFP PHOTO/ Stewart Finlayson.

February 25, 2015                                   New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.

OH NO …

In a previous post, “DID ABSTRACT ART EXIST 35,000 YEARS AGO? – THE CHAUVET CAVE“,  it appears that abstract art existed some 35,000 years ago. Then, in another post, “‘THE HAND OF THE DANCER” * – Cave Paintings in Indonesia Change Ideas about the Origin and Age of Oldest Art,” we reported that the earliest known cave paintings date back 40,000 years. “Early artists made them by carefully blowing paint around hands that were pressed tightly against the cave walls and ceilings. The oldest is at least 40,000 years old.” Now, it appears that “Abstract Art” was invented some 39,000 years ago – by the Neanderthals.

As reported by Art Daily,

“The discovery of geometric shapes carved into a cave in Gibraltar dating back more than 39,000 years is the earliest example of cave art of the Neanderthals, with researchers suggesting that these extinct cousins ​​of modern humans were also capable of abstraction.”

“Markings dating back 40,000 years suggest Neanderthals were considerably more sophisticated than previously thought, researchers say. They reached their conclusions after the discovery of engravings deep in Gorham’s Cave in Gibraltar — the first Neanderthal cave etchings found anywhere in the world. Are the deep grooves of horizontal and vertical criss-crossing lines art? Archaeologists are refusing to go that far, but they say, it shows Neanderthals — contrary to long-held beliefs — did possess the capacity for abstract thought and expression.”

“The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. The paper, “‘A rock engraving made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar,‘” was authored by a team that included specialists in the Neanderthal field such as professors Joaquin Rodriguez-Vidal, Francesco d’Errico and Francisco Giles Pacheco.

“‘The production of purposely made painted or engraved designs on cave walls is recognized as a major cognitive step in human evolution, considered exclusive to modern humans,” the authors wrote. D’Errico, of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), called it “the first example of cave art, an abstract representation made by Neanderthals and deeply engraved in the rock in a part of the cave they lived in.'”

Watch the video.

gorham's cave

 

“The carving, discovered after years of excavation at Gorham’s Cave, was eventually found beneath a Neanderthal sediment level that was itself discovered below a modern human sediment level. It was the first area of bedrock that was exposed by the researchers, suggesting there may be other engravings yet to be discovered. Not a casual mark Researchers also tried to learn how Neanderthals might have made the engraving.”

EFFORT REQUIRED

“‘They used stone Neanderthal tools to show that each groove required consistent, repetitive strokes in a single direction. “To produce one of the grooves required 60 strokes, always in one direction,” Finlayson said, adding that the whole of the etching required up to 317 strokes. “We were immediately showing that this was not a casual mark. This required effort.'”

“Close examination of the same cave in Gibraltar revealed that Neanderthals may have caught, butchered and cooked wild pigeons long before modern humans became regular consumers of bird meat, a study earlier this month said. Other recent studies have shown that in addition to meat, Neanderthals ate vegetables, berries and nuts, that they took care of their elders and used sophisticated bone tools.

“An enigmatic branch of the human family tree, Neanderthals lived in parts of Europe, Central Asia and Middle East for up to 300,000 years but vanished from the fossil record about 30-40,000 years ago.”

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

 

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PAPERS, PRESERVATION, MINUS PUBLISHERS

new york public library

New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.

A recent article in ArtDaily, has caused us to ask  “Where are the Book Publishers in Preservation?* (Ans. below.)

PRESERVATION

ArtDaily,The New York Public Library will soon digitize and make more accessible to the public 50,000 pages of historic early American manuscript material, courtesy of a $500,000 grant from The Polonsky Foundation.”

“The material will include portions of the papers of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, Noah Webster, James Madison, James Monroe and others, as well as other important items documenting life in the early United States.”

“The materials will be digitized over the next two years, preserving them for future generations and making them more accessible to the public through the Library’s new Archives Portal, developed by the Library’s NYPL Labs under the Leadership of Collections Strategy, and located at archives.nypl.org.”

UNIVERSAL ACCESS

“The portal provides direct access to digitized material directly via the online description. The digitized content can be discovered and viewed anywhere online, allowing the reader to zoom in to view minute page details, recreating the intimate experience of browsing boxes and folders in a physical archive.”

“So far, the Archives Portal includes descriptions of nearly 10,000 collections, representing over 50,000 feet of material. The comprehensive access to the archival and manuscript collections at NYPL made possible through the portal is a result of NYPL’s concentrated efforts over the last decade to make sure all of its unique archival collections are described and that the guides to these collections are available online. http://archives.nypl.org/collection/digital. Digitizing these materials not only allow scholars working around the world to study them remotely, but makes them more broadly accessible for the general public and easier to use for educational purposes. ”

MORE:

The Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford and the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (Vatican Library) have joined efforts in a landmark digitization project with the aim of opening up their repositories of ancient texts. Over the course of the next four years, 1.5 million pages from their remarkable collections will be made freely available online to researchers and to the general public.”

The Bodleian’s Gutenberg Bible (click, view the whole book)

 

“The initiative has been made possible by a £2 million award from the Polonsky Foundation. Dr Leonard Polonsky, who is committed to democratizing access to information, sees the increase of digital access to these two library collections — among the greatest in the world — as a significant step in sharing intellectual resources on a global scale.”

WHERE ARE ALL THE PUBLISHERS AT?

Q. Where are all the noted book publishers in this immense effort for preservation and access?

*A. Nowhere.

Q. Why?

A. ______________________.

 

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3e étage, the Paris Ballet, and the New Media

3e étage, Solistes et danseurs de l'Opéra de Paris

3e étage, Solistes et danseurs de l’Opéra de Paris

3e étage – Soloists and Dancers of the Paris Opera Ballet

“3e étage is a group that highlights the singularity of some of the most exceptional dancers from the Paris Opera Ballet in ingeniously structured shows, which allow them to unleash the full range of their prodigious capabilities.

Under the direction of choreographer Samuel Murez, these exciting artists bring a playful sensibility and irreverent touch to performances that take the spectator from classical masterpieces such as “Swan Lake” to acclaimed original works like the whimsical “Epiphénomènes”, as well as pieces by master choreographers such as William Forsythe and Roland Petit.”

3e étage, Dance & New Media

How can “dance” use the New Media, to make Dance vibrant, compelling, and have you wishing for more? The 3 videos below show 3e étage’s brilliant and creative use of the New Media. Creative use of the New Media does not mean “bells and whistles.”  Instead,  means first, a clean UI, second. a combination of movement and music, and third, intimate portrayals which brings the Dance to the person, and the person to the Dance.

3e étage has achieved all three of these objectives. See for yourself.

Killer Video 1

Killer Video 2

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/47465730″>Amouage | Interlude</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/bacchus”>Bacchus</a&gt; on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

 

Killer Video 3

 

Gallery, especially this one, a favorite: DANCER Lydie Vareilhes, PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Murez, PIECE Épiphénomènes, CHOREOGRAPHER Samuel Murez

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3e étage has preformed at the Jacob’s Pillow Festival, Becket (Massachusetts), USA in 2011, and 2013.

 

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