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British Library opens largest ever exhibition on the history, literature and culture of Anglo-Saxon England. Can you see it online?

Screen Shot 2018-10-24 at 4.45.12 PM.pngCodex Amiatinus on loan from Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana to Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms at the British Library © Sam Lane Photography.

The Exhibition

“Treasures from the British Library’s own collection, including the beautifully illuminated Lindisfarne Gospels, Beowulf and Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, sit alongside stunning finds from Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire Hoard. The world-famous Domesday Book offers its unrivalled depiction of the landscape of late Anglo-Saxon England while Codex Amiatinus, a giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716, returns to England for the first time in 1300 years.” (British Library).

“Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War,” is the largest ever exhibition on the history, literature and culture of Anglo-Saxon England spanning all six centuries from the eclipse of Roman Britain in the 5th century to the Norman Conquest of 1066. (Art Daily)

The Anglo-Saxons

“In the wake of the breakdown of Roman rule in Britain from the middle of the fourth century, present day England was progressively settled by Germanic groups. Collectively known as the “Anglo-Saxons“, these were Angles and Saxons from what is now the Danish/German border area and Jutes from the Jutland peninsula.” (wikipedia).

The Exhibition, From Here

In this blog we report on the Book, and Fine Art in the New Media. For the exhibition above, we want to find out how the New Media was used to make the Exhibition available to everyone, everywhere.

      The British Library Site

The British Library site does not make much of the Exhibition available on its website to us sitting here. It consists of one page. It has one image from the exhibition, along with a snappy video (below.) There is a link to Download Digitised Manuscripts from the AngloSaxon Kingdoms, but it is not displayed on the Exhibition web page,  so it is difficult to locate, and is cumbersome to use.

    The Print Media

The British Library site contains links to articles in the The Guardian and the Evening Standard. It is in these two articles that the range and depth of the exhibition is shown. Here are some  of the images published by the print media.

The Guardian

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An early text of Beowulf. Photograph: British Library.

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The Codex Amiatinus, Photograph: Alicia Canter for the Guardian.

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Spong Man, sculpyure, early or mid-fifth century, found on Spong Hill in Norfolk. Photograph: Alicia Canter for the Guardian.

      The Evening Standard

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Vercelli Book, Biblioteca Capitolare de Vercelli, Italy

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St Cuthbert Gospel, Sam Lane

The Book in the New Media

Unfortunately the British Library site does not make access the manuscripts from the Exhibition easy to find or easy to use. One has to independently search the Library online, beginning with the Explore the British Library page, then click on the “View online British Library web page, image or document” then to the Press page, then go to the Blog page even to find the link to Download Digitised Manuscripts from the AngloSaxon Kingdoms.

October 24, 2018 by Jack Dziamba. New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.
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