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2017 – The Merger of Science and Art – The Universe and Beyond …

December 28, 2016 by Jack Dziamba. New Post Goes Up Every Wednesday.
 Vincent Van Gogh, "Starry Night."

Vincent Van Gogh, Starry Night.

SCIENCE AND ART

Often a false dichotomy serves as the basis for much of the debate in Economics, Politics, and even in Science, and Art. The false dichotomy wrongly assumes that the answer is either this or that – there are only two alternatives, and that they are mutually exclusive. Oceans of print and a whole universe of bits and bytes are devoted to the myth of a false dichotomy. This is true in the realms of Science and Art. The false dichotomy is that there is only one nature to “reality” the scientific, not the artistic. The conventional wisdom is that the two are mutually exclusive. Enter the Universe.

THE UNIVERSE

The universe is a perfect example of the false dichotomy between Science and Art.  One need only look.  A recent article,  by Ethan Siegel,  Hubble’s Shining View Of Deep Space Beyond The Stars,” Ethan Siegelin the 12/26/16 issue of Forbes serves to illuminate the point.As Siegel writes, “From any point on Earth’s surface, a clear night sky reveals a treasure trove of stars and deep-sky objects.”

Landmarks of the southern skies, along with the location of the GOODS-S ERS field. Image credit: A. Fujii; illustration by NASA, ESA, and Z. Levay (STScI).

Landmarks of the southern skies, along with the location of the GOODS-S ERS field. Image credit: A. Fujii; illustration by NASA, ESA, and Z. Levay (STScI).

“Through a powerful telescope, billions of objects become visible, from stars and nebulae to the galaxies beyond our own.

With the success of the Hubble deep fields in revealing distant, hitherto unseen galaxies, 2010 brought a new camera and a new ambition.”

Galaxies from the present day to when the Universe was just 5% of its current age are all visible together in this stunning view of the Universe. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O'Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute).

Galaxies from the present day to when the Universe was just 5% of its current age are all visible together in this stunning view of the Universe. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute).

“The installation of the Wide Field Camera 3 enabled simultaneously large, deep views of space as never before.”

Cosmic rarities, like merging galaxies (top) and gravitational lensing phenomena (middle) can be seen at various points in the image. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O'Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute). Image was cropped and enhanced by E. Siegel, and credits are the same for the rest of the images in this post.

Cosmic rarities, like merging galaxies, and gravitational lensing phenomena can be seen at various points in the image. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst, S. Cohen, M. Mechtley, and M. Rutkowski (Arizona State University, Tempe), R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Observatories), N. Hathi (University of California, Riverside), R. Ryan (University of California, Davis), H. Yan (Ohio State University), and A. Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute). Image was cropped and enhanced by E. Siegel.

 

“Diffraction spikes indicate stars within the Milky Way, with vastly more distant galaxies visible in the abyss beyond.

Bright objects with diffraction spikes are stars within our own galaxy; everything else imaged is a galaxy beyond our own

The bluest galaxies house intense star formation, while the reddest galaxies appear so because the expanding Universe stretches the light’s wavelength. Some regions of this mosaic clearly demonstrate a total dearth of foreground, Milky Way stars. These regions provide the best windows into the distant Universe.” (Siegel)

YES, BUT IS IT ART?

Although over 7,500 galaxies were uncovered in this mosaic, over ten times as many are likely yet to be seen.

As many galaxies are revealed here are just the brightest and most easily seen ones. Less than 10% of what's out there is revealed by GOODS. Infrared telescopes , like the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are required to view the rest. The JWST will reveal the Universe even more deeply.

As many galaxies are revealed here are just the brightest and most easily seen ones. Less than 10% of what’s out there is revealed by GOODS. Infrared telescopes , like the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are required to view the rest. The JWST will reveal the Universe even more deeply.

MORE:

The Universe and Art, Mori Museum

 

 

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