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DADA 100

July 13, 2016. New Post Goes Up Bi-Weekly on Wednesday  for July and August, by Jack Dziamba
Hannah Höch "Ohne Titel (Aus einem ethnographischen Museum)," 1930 Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg

Hannah Höch “Ohne Titel (Aus einem ethnographischen Museum),” 1930, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg

Dada is not Non-Sense 

“The Dada movement was a protest against the barbarism of World War I, the bourgeois interests that Dada adherents believed inspired the war, and what they believed was an oppressive intellectual rigidity in both art and everyday society. ”  

“Dada’s purpose was “to create “… shorn of intelligible words, music devoid of melodies and statements in which the message was cannibalized by the absurdity of the language” as “a protest against a European civilization hellbent on war.” Source: New York Times, Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim, “Dada Was Born 100 Years Ago. So What?” July 8, 2016.

“So intent were members of Dada on opposing all norms of bourgeois culture that the group was barely in favor of itself: “Dada is anti-Dada,” they often cried. The group’s founding in the Cabaret Voltaire in Zürich was appropriate: the Cabaret was named after the eighteenth century French satirist, Voltaire, whose novella Candide mocked the idiocies of his society. As Hugo Ball, one of the founders of both the Cabaret and Dada wrote, “‘This is our Candide against the times.”‘ (Source: theartstory)

Dada – A Brief History

“Dada was an artistic and literary movement that began in Zürich, Switzerland. It arose as a reaction to World War I and the nationalism that many thought had led to the war. Influenced by other avant-garde movements – Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, and Expressionism – its output was wildly diverse, ranging from performance art to poetry, photography, sculpture, painting, and collage. Dada’s aesthetic, marked by its mockery of materialistic and nationalistic attitudes, proved a powerful influence on artists in many cities, including Berlin, Hanover, Paris, New York, and Cologne, all of which generated their own groups. ” (Source: theartstory)

 The Merce Cunningham Dance Company during a dress rehearsal in 2001 for the choreographer’s “Interscape.” Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

The Merce Cunningham Dance Company during a dress rehearsal in 2001 for the choreographer’s “Interscape.” Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Dada in All Its Forms
To experience the breadth of the Dada Movement, take a look at the links the categories below:

Jean (Hans) Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, George Grosz, John Heartfield, Hannah Höch, Francis Picabia, Man Ray, Kurt Schwitters, Sophie Taeuber.(Source: wikipedia)

More

Marcel Duchamp 1968 BBC interview (for a brief introduction to Duchamp and his work, View up to 3:14 )

H/T Open Culture

 

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