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80,000 video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3-D models, all freely available to anyone who wants to reuse copyright-free images and media.

The Public Domain Project, launched this week by royalty-free video marketplace Pond5, is a digital vault of 80,000 video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3-D models, all embeddable and freely available to anyone who wants to reuse copyright-free images and media. 

As explained by Carey Dunne in FastCode Design, on January 22, 2103,

“They’re impeccably organized, labeled, and tagged, so you can find just the type of clip or image you’re looking for.

Content ranges from historic photographs to footage of famous speeches to NASA imagery.

Among the gems on the site are 5,000 film clips that had previously been virtually inaccessible, living only in analog form in the National Archives outside of Washington.”

80,000 Media Assets Freely Available Via The Public Domain Project

Ms. Dunne continues,

“It can be hard for artists, designers, photo editors, and other creatives to track down Public Domain materials for their work. A number of resources offer copyright-free material—like Shutterstock or the National Archives—but none are so vast and localized as the Public Domain Project, launched this week by royalty-free video marketplace Pond5.

It’s a digital vault of 80,000 video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3-D models, all embeddable and freely available to anyone who wants to reuse copyright-free images and media. They’re impeccably organized, labeled, and tagged, so you can find just the type of clip or image you’re looking for. Content ranges from footage of turn-of-the-century New York City to Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech to Georges Méliès’ 1902 film, A Trip To The Moon.

Among the gems on the site are 5,000 film clips that had previously been virtually inaccessible, living only in analog form in the National Archives outside of Washington. The Public Domain Project has digitized these for the first time, thanks in part to the $61 million in funding Pond5 raised last year from Accel Partners and Stripes Group.”

Fine Art in the New Media

This project meets all of the criteria for Fine Art in the New Media as set forth on our Purpose Page,

“1. Fine Art in the new media is that it should be accessible, from the Google Art Project, and the new and dynamic Museum websites for the Louvre, the Metropolitan, the Musée d’Orsay, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Van Gogh Museum, and others so that, “There is [virtually] nothing between me and my Leonardo.”

2. Fine Art in the new media should be interactive, the zoom views of Google Art being a present prime example.

3. Fine Art in the new media should be viewer directed. “I want to see what I want to see.”

4. Fine Art in the new media should be able to be manipulated, which enables the viewer to use their creativity. to examine, adapt, and experiment with the art. In this sense, you can even make one of your pictures look like a Warhol .

5. Fine Art in the new media should be comparative , enabling the viewer to array pictures from different museums side by side to study technique, execution, and genre.

6. Lastly, Fine Art in the new media should be able to be viewed as a continuum. of humanity’s effort at visual expression.”

Pond5 also offers a handy video primer on what the Public Domain is, exactly, how content ends up in the Public Domain, and usage rights regarding its content:

H/T The Creator’s Project

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