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E – MUSEUMS: Pearlman Collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Art Goes Online

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Amedeo Modigliani, Jean Cocteau, 1916-17. Oil on canvas.

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Pearlman Collection  of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Art launches its website

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The Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, owner of 72 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works, makes its collection accessible to everyone with the launch of pearlmancollection.org.

Daniel Edelman, President of the foundation, says:

Our aim is to share these works of art with those who cannot view them in person. This website, independent of the spatial, geographical, environmental and political constraints of exhibition, is designed to provide the virtual means for visitors to explore, study and enjoy our collection. Some of these tools would be challenging, or impossible, to replicate in the real world. It is our hope that this website, and other virtual collections of art, present new learning opportunities by lowering some of the barriers that have historically defined public accessibility to art.

The pearlmancollection.org site includes excerpts from Pearlman’s reminiscences, providing context about how the collection was assembled. Conservator’s notes also highlight the techniques and circumstances of artists at work, and links to related documents held at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art deepen our understanding about the interaction between artist and collector.

The Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection is on long-term loan to The Princeton University Art Museum, where many of the major works are on display. A five-city tour of the collection’s masterpieces – organized in conjunction with Princeton – is planned for 2014-15. While individual works are often loaned to special exhibitions around the world, the collection has not been seen outside of the New York area for more than 35 years.

More Information follow this link to ArtDaily.

NEW YORK, NY.- The Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, owner of 72 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works, makes its collection accessible to everyone with the launch of pearlmancollection.org.

Daniel Edelman, President of the foundation, says: “Our aim is to share these works of art with those who cannot view them in person. This website, independent of the spatial, geographical, environmental and political constraints of exhibition, is designed to provide the virtual means for visitors to explore, study and enjoy our collection. Some of these tools would be challenging, or impossible, to replicate in the real world. It is our hope that this website, and other virtual collections of art, present new learning opportunities by lowering some of the barriers that have historically defined public accessibility to art.”

The pearlmancollection.org site includes excerpts from Pearlman’s reminiscences, providing context about how the collection was assembled. Conservator’s notes also highlight the techniques and circumstances of artists at work, and links to related documents held at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art deepen our understanding about the interaction between artist and collector. The Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection is on long-term loan to The Princeton University Art Museum, where many of the major works are on display. A five-city tour of the collection’s masterpieces – organized in conjunction with Princeton – is planned for 2014-15. While individual works are often loaned to special exhibitions around the world, the collection has not been seen outside of the New York area for more than 35 years.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/66516/Pearlman-Collection-of-Impressionist-and-Post-Impressionist-art-launches-its-website#.UpuEGY3B4y4[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

THE PERLMAN COLLECTION ONLINE

No finer statement about making Art accessibile to everyone can be made than the one made by The Perlman Collection itself:

With this website, the directors of the Henry and Rose Perlman Foundation hope to provide an engaging self-guided exploration of the collection. Exposing works of art to those who cannot view them in person, the site also attempts ways of organizing and viewing art that would be challenging, or impossible, even with such a visit. It is our hope that new learning opportunities will result from removing some of the obstacles – geography, space limitations, environmental risks, politics of ownership – that have historically defined public accessibility to art.

THE WEBSITE

The Perlman Foundation website is designed with clear simplicity, making the art the focus, not the technology. But, it is tthrogh the technology  removes “some of the obstacles – geography, space limitations, environmental risks, politics of ownership – that have historically defined public accessibility to art.”

The website has four categoties, AboutArtists, Timeline, and Exhibitions. As stated by ArtDaily,

The website, developed by Bluespark Labs [cite], allows visitors to enjoy individual artists and works as a private collector would – intimately and over time; to examine each work at the brushstroke level of image resolution and right up to the unframed edges of each canvas; to create their own galleries from the collection; and to save those galleries privately or share them socially.

Amedeo_ModiglianiHere we will highlight Modigliani. The biographical note contains this poignant note about his life:

Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) lived a much-fabled life among the international avant-garde circles in early 20th-century Paris. Although he died at the age of thirty-five, Modigliani was a prolific artist, best known for his uniquely stylized paintings and drawings of friends, lovers, fellow artists, and literary figures.

The page on Modigliani’s portrait of Jean Cocteau Modigliani (left) contains the following critical Perspective:

Modigliani moved from his native Italy to Paris in 1906 and soon became part of the city’s vibrant artistic and literary culture. His portraits often portray friends from this bohemian world, such as the poet, playwright, and filmmaker Jean Cocteau. Cocteau’s elongated head, neck, and nose, as well as his simplified features, recall the artist’s sculptural work, which was informed by his study of the so-called “primitive” forms of non-Western sculpture. The color tonalities, drawing style, and overall composition of the portrait reflect the strong influence of Cézanne.

It also contains notes by Mr. Perlman. He writes of an interesting article by Cocteau about not having the money to buy his own portrait:

When Modigliani did my portrait, he worked in the same workshop as Kisling on rue Joseph-Bara. I do not know what has become of the portrait by Kisling where one can see Picasso having lunch in the background, and wearing a black checked shirt. The portrait by Modigliani was on a large canvas. He sold it to me for 5 francs. I had not, alas, enough money to pay for the car which would enable me to take the portrait to my house. Kisling owed 11 francs to the Cafe Rotonde. He proposed to give the proprietor this portrait in exchange. The proprietor accepted, and the canvas commenced a voyage which was terminated by a sale of 17 million francs in America. I am not telling you this story to complain, but to tell you that we could have become wealthy, and that we did not become so.

CONCLUSION

This is an excellent example of an E- Museum that is making art universally accessible to everyone, regardless of geography or background.
The Pearlman site gives us a more complete and interesting perspective of Modigliani than many of the popular Art History 101 Texts.

H/T: ArtDaily

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