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E-MUSEUMS: THE VERSAILLES / GOOGLE PARTNERSHIP

GOOGLE ART CONTINUES TO ASTOUND

In a unique partnership with Chateau Versailles, GoogleArt and Google Cultural Institute have produced one of the highest examples yet of Fine Art in the New Media.

Just take a look at this:

IT DOESN’T STOP THERE

NOW, YOU HAVE TO SEE THIS (NOT A TALKING HEAD IN SIGHT)

IN FRENCH ALSO, OF COURSE (AND OTHER LANGUAGES)

HOW DO THEY DO IT?

GOOGLE CULTURAL INSTITUTE


Google’s Cultural Institute develops technological solutions for viewing, hosting and digitising materials to favour the creative presentation, protection and promotion of culture online.

Thanks to its dedicated team of engineers, Google’s Cultural Institute has already collaborated with organisations in several countries on different projects, notably for putting online thousands of artworks in the framework of the Art Project, the digitisation of the archives of Nelson Mandela and the Dead Sea Manuscripts.

FINE ART IN THE NEW MEDIA – THE OBJECTIVES

As outlined in the Purpose Page:

1. The first point about Fine Art in the New Media is that it should be accessible, from the Google Art Project, and the new and dynamic Museum websites for the Louvre, the Metropolitan, the Musée d’Orsay, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Van Gogh Museum, and others so that, “There is [virtually] nothing between me and my Leonardo.”

2. Fine Art in the new media should be interactive, the zoom views of Google Art being a present prime example:

3. Fine Art in the new media should be viewer directed. “I want to see what I want to see.”

4. Fine Art in the new media should be able to be manipulated, which enables the viewer to use their creativity. to examine, adapt, and experiment with the art. In this sense, you can even make one of your pictures look like a Warhol piece.

5. Fine Art in the new media should be comparative, enabling the viewer to array pictures from different museums side by side to study technique, execution, and genre.

6. Lastly, Fine Art in the new media should be able to be viewed as a continuum of man’s effort at visual expression.

Google and Versailles have done it all.

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